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As software editors and sequencers were almost unheard of by the average musician in the early 80’s, Roland never released any software specific to the JUNO 106.  Nowadays it is almost unheard of for a hardware instrument not to have a software editor (even guitars are coming out with a software editor).


Since I really wanted to be able to automate parameters on my beloved JUNO 106, and the likelihood of Roland retrofitting it with a software editor was nil, naturally I would just have to tackle this myself. 


I had “Frankensteined” a few applications together in the past to make such automation possible, but these options were never easy to use when inspiration struck.  When Ableton and Cycling 74‘ announced MaxForLive, I knew I would finally be able to easily control my studio hardware the way I wanted (not to say the initial design would be easy). Several cups of coffee, a little calculus refresher, and a few droopy-eyed mornings later I finished JunoControl.  


Thank you to Nick Rothwell for featuring my work in his Max For Live article in Sound On Sound.